Quick, Powerful Seasonal Allergy Relief for Infant

Does you need fast infant allergy relief for your infant’s allergy?

Or are you worried whether your infant’s allergy treatment is the RIGHT one for them?

I understand that all you want is for your infant to feel better… and given the number of infant allergy medicines available the problem seems complicated.

But don’t worry!

In today’s quick article, I give you all the answers you need confidently pick the BEST plan for your infant’s allergy relief.You came to this article trying to find a solution for your infant’s seasonal allergy symptoms and are looking for the fastest allergy relief for infants.  I have you covered in this article!

But first I need to ask if you’re SURE it’s allergies?

The reason I ask is that your infant’s symptoms are usually NOT due to allergies!

That’s why I wrote this article on whether your infant’s allergy symptoms are REALLY caused by allergies?  If you haven’t read that article yet, it covers 3 important topics:

  1. Why your infant’s allergy symptoms are not ACTUALLY allergies
  2. What else might cause your infants allergies
  3. How and when to test for allergies (PS – this part of the post could save you $500!)

Once we get your infant a correct diagnosis, you’ll find this article can help your infant’s allergy relief even more!

Who should read this article?

allergy relief for infants can make them very happy
My Boys. They had allergy symptoms that were actually due to acid reflux!

I’ve targeted this article for parents with infants (age less than 6 months) who want to know how to best treat your infant’s seasonal allergy symptoms.

Note: If you’re looking for help for an older child, I am almost finished my article on allergies in babies, allergies in toddlers or a huge guide all about allergic reactions in infants(if you click the link, I’ll work to finish those faster for you!)

Based on this, you should read this article if:

  • You now know your infant doesn’t have allergies—but want the best treatment for what’s causing their symptoms
  • You want the best symptomatic infant allergy relief plan

If you want to know more about infant allergy medications, I cover that here but this post is more about treating the true cause of your infant’s symptoms.

If you’re unsure if this article will help, why not make it easy on yourself by filling out this 3 minute quiz and getting a personalized allergist’s plan!

Get your infant allergy relief plan right now!

If I were to guess, 9 out of 10 of you are reading this during a brief, 15 minute nap window.  Or maybe it’s one of those rare moments where your infant is awake, alert and just happy.

Either way, I know you have limited time.

Click this button below and in 7 questions (2-3 minutes) I can give you a quick, personalized infant allergy relief plan.

Get your Quick, Powerful Seasonal Allergy Relief for Infant’s plan here!

Breakdown of this Article:

I’ve set this article up so if you came from my seasonal allergies in infants article, you can jump straight to the right treatment option.

Or, if you’re unsure, read the first section about a general plan to provide seasonal allergy relief for infants.

General plan for allergy relief (for infants)

If you want a generalized plan to give your infant allergy relief OR you don’t believe there is a different cause… well, that’s OK.

I want to make sure you have the best plan possible.

Here is a good allergist’s allergy relief (for infants) plan:

Non-medication infant allergy relief:

  • Get a humidifier and run it at the head of the bed at night
    • This provides moisture and makes the nasal mucosa ‘healthy’
    • Do NOT add Vicks VapoRub or anything similar (it can cause problems for your infant)
  • Consider a saline spray to help irrigate out nose symptoms
    • Add this with one of those blue suction bulb thingy to help
    • Or you can use a NoseFrida (which my wife swears by but I wanted to vomit every time.  I mentally couldn’t get past it.  Oh, and in case you don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s a video I found to show you)

Medication infant allergy relief:

There are two different medication options for you.  Both are safe, but have nuances:

  1. Zyrtec (cetirizine)
    • This is the best option regarding side effects
      • It lasts a full 24 hours
      • Causes minimal drowsiness (if you take at night, no groggy feeling in AM)
    • But it doesn’t have an FDA indication below 6 months
    • For a 6-month-old, the dose is 2.5mg once a day at night
      • As an allergist, I have used it in younger kids (after discussing it is not on FDA guidelines)
      • If less than 6 months, I start 1.25mg once a day
  2. Benadryl (diphenhydramine)
    • This option has more side effects
      • It only lasts 4-6 hours
      • It causes sleepiness in most infants (hyperactivity in some)
      • It causes dry mouth and nose and risk of nose bleeds
    • It has been grandfathered into an FDA approval.  So I don’t have a study showing its safe… its just assumed safe after decades of use
    • For an infant, the dosing is weight based:
      • < 10 pounds—don’t use
      • 11-17 pounds—1/2 teaspoon (2.5ml) of the 12.5mg/5ml strength every 6 hours
      • 17-22 lbs—3/4 teaspoon (3.75ml) of the 12.5mg/5ml strength  every 6 hours

If you’re unsure, ask me and I will tell you better guidance for your infant’s allergy relief.

This, overall, is a great generalized infant allergy relief plan.  It incorporates non-medicine components and the medicines you might need.

BUT…

I will again tell you that your infant’s allergy symptoms are most likely NOT due to allergies.

Finding the actual problem and fixing that is always the best plan.



Specific allergy symptom relief plan

Fix infant allergy relief by fixing colds or infections
Colds/infections are a major cause of infant allergy symptoms

1.  Colds / infections

If a cold or infection is causing your infant’s symptoms, the first two weeks of symptoms are due to viral infections and need symptomatic treatment.

If the symptoms last longer than about 2 weeks, it is bacterial and also needs antibiotics.

But here are your best non-medicine and over-the-counter medicine (including a few different infants allergy medicine choices) that will help:

Non-medicine infant allergy relief—colds/infections

  1. Fluids are the most important treatment you can do to help
    • If your infant is sick, they might not want to drink milk or other fluids.  This is ok for a short period, but not for long.
    • Push fluids and take them to see their doctor if ANY of these happen:
      • If there are fewer than 6 wet diapers in a 24 hour period
      • Diapers that stay dry for 2-3 hours
      • Dark yellow or concentrated urine
      • Dry lips, tongue, eyes
      • Tearless crying
      • Dry or slack skin
      • Sunken eyes or fontanels (soft spots)
      • If your baby is tired, listless, or otherwise not acting normal
    • You can read more about it What to Expect’s article on Spotting and Preventing Dehydration in Babies
  2. Add a humidifier at the head of their crib/sleeping area and run it when they’re sleeping (just remember to avoid the Vicks VapoRub)
  3. Consider a gentle sinus mist and that suction bulb thingy to remove snot from nose

 Medication infant allergy relief—colds/infections

There are few medications I recommend for infants with colds or infections.  Most of the time symptomatic treatment is enough.  But if you wanted any, I’d consider benadryl (diphenhydramine).

The reason?

Benadryl’s side effects of sleepiness and drying of nose help the symptoms improve (yes, we’re using the side effects as the main reason to take the allergy medicine… not the antihistamine properties).

  1. Benadryl (diphenhydramine)
    • This option has more side effects
      • It only lasts 4-6 hours
      • It causes sleepiness in most infants (hyperactivity in some)
      • It causes dry mouth and nose and risk of nose bleeds
    • It has been grandfathered into an FDA approval.  So I don’t have a study showing its safe… its just assumed safe after decades of use
    • For an infant, the dosing is:
      • < 10 pounds—don’t use
      • 11-17 pounds—1/2 teaspoon (2.5ml) of the 12.5mg/5ml strength every 6 hours
      • 17-22 lbs—3/4 teaspoon (3.75ml) of the 12.5mg/5ml strength  every 6 hours
  2. Consider adding tylenol as needed for fevers
  3. If the symptoms last for more than about 14 days, call your primary care provider and get an antibiotic.

Fix teething as a part of a seasonal allergy relief plan
Teething starts 3-6 months and can appear like allergies

2.  Teething

Teething is a common cause of allergy-type symptoms.  Teething starts, on average, at 6 months but can begin as early as 3 months!

If your infant has allergy symptoms (stuffy nose, runny nose, congested) but also have increase in drooling, swollen gums, irritability or trouble sleeping or even rubbing her face/pulling her ears, then think teething!

Here is a list of things to try (try one, try all… whatever it takes, right?!) to help your infant with their teething symptoms:

Non-medicine relief – teething

  1. Gum massage
  2. Cold items to chew on
    • Give them a cold spoon to chew on (put it in the fridge, not the freezer or you’ll get a Christmas Story Scenario)
    • Cold washcloth (this once can be fridge or freezer)
    • Chilled baby foods (every bit helps)
    • Teething toy or ring (chill these in fridge or freezer too)
  3. Wooden spoon or teether (good enough… just make sure it’s not a splintered spoon).
  4. Cold fruit (perhaps in a mesh feeder)
  5. Vibrating teether (Luke has one of these and loves it)
  6. Not your thumb (Luke also loves this… and got me big time last night when I wasn’t paying attention.  He’s like a shark… so fast and with teeth so sharp!)

 Medication relief – teething

  1. Baby Orajel or Orajel Naturals
  2. Tylenol for fever or pain relief
  3. There is no benefit to benadryl or Zyrtec infant allergy relief medications for teething.

Acid Reflux is a very common and missed cause of allergy symptoms

3.  Acid reflux

How can you even tell if your infant’s allergy symptoms are acid reflux?

It’s difficult.

But acid reflux is common in infants and can happen 30 or more times in a day.  The most common symptoms are:

  • Regurgitation (is worse around 4 months old)
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose (here’s your allergy symptoms!)
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Infants who frequently spit up food or milk (whether it may bothers them or may not).

If you suspect acid reflux, there are a few things you can do to help but I think this is a time to see your primary care provider to discuss treatment options and make sure there isn’t another reason for reflux symptoms.

Non-medicine relief—acid reflux

  1. Thickening food (often with a rice cereal if possible)
  2. Keep your infant upright after meals
  3. Elimination of any tobacco smoke
    • There is a correlation between tobacco smoke exposure and infant reflux, but it’s not sure why
    • So caregivers should not smoke in home or car
  4. Smaller feedings (provided your infant has normal weight gain)
  5. Possibly a milk free diet
    • This is controversial, but elimination of dairy for 2 weeks is something to consider
    • If your infant is breast feeding, you can try eliminating milk and beef from mom’s diet for a 2 week period

Medicine relief—acid reflux

If you want to consider medication, you should see your primary care provider.

Normally, they will prescribe your infant one of two types of acid suppressing medications.  Typical options are:

  1. Zantac (ranitidine)
    • Dose is 5-10mg/kg divided into twice daily dosing
    • It’s a well tolerated and low side effect medication
    • If you start this, you’ll often see benefits within 2-3 days and will see bigger results within a couple weeks
  2. Prilosec (omeprazole)
    • Dose is 0.7mg/kg once a day and does a great job at reducing acid and controlling it for 24 hours
    • If I want faster relief or I’m unsure, I often go for zantac (ranitidine) first because it is cheaper and works faster.
    • But if I need something longer term, I will often switch to omeprazole
  3. There is no additional benefit for infant allergy relief medications.  The key is to stop the acid, not cover the nasal congestion with allergy medications.

treat irritant allergies as a great allergy relief for infants
If none of the other causes sound true, then treatment is focused on irritant rhinitis

4.  Irritant allergies / irritant rhinitis

If you have an infant with allergy symptoms that are not due to colds/infection, teething or acid reflux then it is an irritant rhinitis.

I’ve written about the difference between allergic and irritant rhinitis before, but the symptoms are the same!  It’s the trigger and immune response that is different.

Even though it’s not technically allergies, the best irritant allergy relief medicine for infants is still an allergy medicine.

The BEST plan for irritant allergies would be:

Non-medication infant allergy relief:

  • Get a humidifier and run it at the head of the bed at night
    • As I mentioned above, this provides the nasal mucosa moisture and keeps it healthy
    • Do NOT add Vicks VapoRub, essential oils, or anything similar as these could cause symptoms to get worse
  • Consider a saline spray to help irrigate out nose symptoms (with a suction bulb to get out any excess mucous or saline)

Medication infant allergy relief:

Like I had mentioned above, there are two medication options to provide allergy relief for infants.  Both are safe, but have nuances:

  1. Zyrtec (cetirizine)
    • This is my favorite and is the best option for side effects
      • One dose lasts a full 24 hours
      • It causes minimal drowsiness
    • But it doesn’t have an FDA indication below 6 months
    • For a 6-month-old, the dose is 2.5mg once a day at night
      • As an allergist, I have used it in younger kids (after discussing it is not on FDA guidelines)
      • If less than 6 months, I start 1.25mg once a day
  2. Benadryl (diphenhydramine)
    • Benadryl (diphenhydramine) has more side effects than zyrtec
      • It only lasts 4-6 hours
      • It causes excessive sleepiness in most infants (although a few of you will get to experience infant hyperactivity… so enjoy that!)
      • Causes dry mouth, nose and increased nose bleed risk
    • But it has been grandfathered into an FDA approval.  It hasn’t been proven safe as much as it’s just been used forever.
    • For an infant, the dosing is weight based:
      • < 10 pounds—don’t use
      • 11-17 pounds—1/2 teaspoon (2.5ml) of the 12.5mg/5ml strength every 6 hours
      • 17-22 lbs—3/4 teaspoon (3.75ml) of the 12.5mg/5ml strength  every 6 hours

Still not sure?  No problem!

I know this is a problem that is affecting you, your little one and the entire household. 

It’s easy to fix… once you get the right diagnosis.  But that part can be tricky.

Simply CLICK THE BUTTON BELOW and answer 7 questions (2-3 minutes),  Give me a day or so and I’ll give you a personalized infant allergy relief plan.

Get your Personalized Infant Seasonal Allergy Plan

Summary

I know this was a straight forward article but I hope it helps you narrow down the best infant allergy relief plan.

The key is:

  1. Find the actual underlying diagnosis
  2. Fix the underlying diagnosis
    1. General allergy relief plan
    2. Colds/infections
    3. Teething
    4. Acid Reflux
    5. Irritant allergies / irritant rhinitis

I understand that it may seem like your infant has allergies… and they are, in fact, the same symptoms you’d see in allergies.

But by focusing on the bigger picture you’ll be able to get the correct treatment plan.

Next Steps

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And if you have any topics you’d like to have me write on, or have questions (big or small) that you want to know the answer to, send me a message and let me know your thoughts.

I love tailoring this blog to YOUR needs.

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